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Ft Sill BOLC II - 02 NOV 2008

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Expand view Topic review: Ft Sill BOLC II - 02 NOV 2008

Ft sill

Post by GoNolesmom » Sun Jan 11, 2009 3:12 pm

https://www.armywell-being.org/skins/WB ... a5a0c208f9
Chg of subject. do any one of you rec'd ARMY WELL BEING? Interesting info under title Wham-Bahm, severe shortage of Chaplains in the Military.
Recently had a loooong lay-over in Atlanta airport, met a wonderful student studying Theology at a Cath. University in Pa.
He was a Jr., and "on the fence" about entering the Ministry.
I think it would be great to send recruiters to the Religious Colleges and Universities to maybe ease this shortage.
How can I help? Any info ? My aunt is a Sister of Mercy in Pa., great connections. :)

Re: Ft Sill

Post by Saltydad » Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:37 pm

Hope all had a great Christmas, and were able to see your loved ones. Mine was very lean, down to 148#. Stated he was tired of MRE'S so only ate protein bars. :?

David, I can't believe they will be in Korea, maybe same post. Ask my son if he met him, but was not in his Platoon. My DS will head over in May, and is right now near Casey. He hopes to chg that location. Renewed my pass port, maybe can make a trip over.

Some disturbing news from a fellow (on R&R from Iraq) soldier we met in the airport, they can be deployed from Korea???? I do not know why, I thought he was safe from that, ignorance is bliss I guess.
GoNolesmom,

Had a wonderful Christmas with DS home with whole family. It looks like both your son and mine is going to do Korea. We made the most of it, since my DS may be in Korea for two years.

May should be a nice time of the year for your son to go to Korea, with the weather moderating and moving into summer. My son finishes FA BOLC III the first of May but then goes to White Sands, NM for MLRS training for a month after BOLC III graduation and then to 3 weeks of Airborne School at Benning before heading to Korea some time in July. He has orders for 9 weeks of Ranger School starting September 1st...so I don't know if they will move him up to a earlier Ranger School class after jump school in July or whether he would go to Korea and then come back for Ranger School in September. I'm sure that will all get sorted out.

Yes, according to my son, the 2nd ID can be deployed from Korea and not just draw DMZ duty. Units of the 2nd Infantry Division, which they will both be assigned, have gone to Afghanistan. I'm not sure if units of the 25th ID come over to Korea and relieve them while they are gone, but that is most likely, since the 25th ID is in the Pacific Command and has responsibility to respond to Korea in case of war...and they may use deployment cycles to practice this exercise with the 25th ID and free up units of the 2nd ID to go elsewhere and share the pain and risk of combat with the rest of the Army.

You can Google 2nd Infantry Division and get a lot of good intel off the web sites. I wish your son well as he prepares for service in Korea...and who knows where. Some warm socks and good long underwear are oin order...Korea and Afghanistan can be chilly. God bless.

Saltydad

Post by Kym » Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:32 am

DH left today for Ft Gordon, plans to spend a couple of days driving. Can't wait for BOLCIII to start so we can move on to Ft Bragg!

Good luck to all as they begin the next phase of training!

Ft Sill

Post by GoNolesmom » Mon Jan 05, 2009 8:09 am

Hope all had a great Christmas, and were able to see your loved ones. Mine was very lean, down to 148#. Stated he was tired of MRE'S so only ate protein bars. :?

David, I can't believe they will be in Korea, maybe same post. Ask my son if he met him, but was not in his Platoon. My DS will head over in May, and is right now near Casey. He hopes to chg that location. Renewed my pass port, maybe can make a trip over.

Some disturbing news from a fellow (on R&R from Iraq) soldier we met in the airport, they can be deployed from Korea???? I do not know why, I thought he was safe from that, ignorance is bliss I guess.

Re: Ft Sill BOLC II

Post by Saltydad » Tue Dec 16, 2008 11:10 pm

Thanks for a great Christmas idea, hard to think of what they need as a soldier heading overseas.
Funny you should bring-up the Battle of the Bulge, as a young girl, my parents "lost-me" in the "NUTS" museum in Bastogne France, as you can tell, they found me some TWELVE hours later. Luckly some very nice local folks took care of me.
Stay warm-up there, 80 degrees expected today down here, (just thought I'd throw that in), hope you all have a very Merry Christmas.

Kathleen

P.S. Just-in......They are in-doors now yaahhhh
Hi Kathleen,

Found out last night from my son that he too will be PCS'ing overseas next year to Korea after FA BOLC III. I better go and buy more long underwear for him for Christmas. It was -14 this morning in the Twin Cities...and I know it gets at least that cold this time in Korea.

Saltydad

Ft Sill BOLC II

Post by GoNolesmom » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:54 am

Thanks for a great Christmas idea, hard to think of what they need as a soldier heading overseas.
Funny you should bring-up the Battle of the Bulge, as a young girl, my parents "lost-me" in the "NUTS" museum in Bastogne France, as you can tell, they found me some TWELVE hours later. Luckly some very nice local folks took care of me.
Stay warm-up there, 80 degrees expected today down here, (just thought I'd throw that in), hope you all have a very Merry Christmas.

Kathleen

P.S. Just-in......They are in-doors now yaahhhh

Post by lizzyd » Mon Dec 08, 2008 10:27 pm

My husband was out in the field for the Redleg Capstone exercise (FA BOLCIII Field exercise) two weeks ago and he woke up one morning with frost on his face. There is snow in the forecast for tomorrow afternoon, but it should warm back up by Wednesday. I hope your guys can tough through it for the next few days because its going to be extra cold.

LIZ

Re: Ft Sill BOLC II

Post by Saltydad » Mon Dec 08, 2008 9:58 pm

:) Not much longer now, Ds stated his canteen was half frozen last week. They are expecting snow while they camp under the stars this week, hope they packed their long johns.
I will be happy to see him for Christmas, wish all the good folks on this site could see your loved ones during the holidays. :cry: I guess I will know next year when he is overseas. boo-hooooooo
GoNolesmom,

Camping under the stars...that is a nice way of putting it. My DS sent a request for under-armor underwear for Christmas after some cold nights in Oklahoma. He has to stay at Ft. Sill for BOLC III this winter and finishes at end of April 09.

MY DS is from Minnesota (where it is + 15 degrees and snowing tonight), but he says it is still cold in OK. Prior to going into the Army this past year he was a Railroad Conductor for three years on Freight Trains running between the Twin Cities and central Iowa for the Union Pacific Railroad. He had to work outside a lot in the Minnesota winters, walking the length of 100 car trains fromthe engine to rear car to set air brakes and often was hanging on boxcars as they shoved cars together to make up trains in a railyard in -20 degree weather. He says you never quite get used to it, but you find ways to tolerate the cold and still work.

As much as it is a pain in the butt to put up with a week of cold weather camping, it is good training for soldiers going to Korea like your DS (or for those going to Afhghanistan). In fighting in Iraq, where it is hot most of the time, we lose sight of many places where it is really cold to fight...Korea and Afghanistan...continuing hot spots in cold places.

I served with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force (3rd FSSG, 3rd MARDIV, and 1st Marine Air Wing) on Okinawa for three years in the mid-80's and we were the ready reaction force to reinforce the US Army 2nd Infanty Division on the DMZ in Korea (along with the 25th ID from Hawaii, Alaska, and Ft. Lewis, WA) if North Korea attacked across the 38th parallel. Twice a year we practiced a fire drill to get to Korea ASAP (each Fall we practiced an exercise called "Bear Hunt" that went from September through December and the other from February-April called "Team Spirit"...where all of III MEF flew or went by ship into Korea prepared to fight North Korea). I had many a cold night in Korea on those operations "camping out with the Marines under the stars" in field conditions. It was good training in fighting in the cold and learning how to live outside and fight in the winter.

The Army and Marine Corps have long memories of the Battle of the Choisen Resevior fought in December 1950 up near the Yalu River next to China, where the 1st Marine Regiment and the 7th Army Regiment fought bloody battles, outnumbered 20 to 1, against the Chinese Army... in weather that reached -50 degrees in blowing snow storms. They called it the "Frozen Choisen." My Marine OCS Platoon Sergent in 1965 fought in that frigid battle in 1950 with the 1st Marines under Col. "Chesty" Puller, USMC, and he won a Navy Cross (like the Distinguished Service Cross in the Army...next in preceedance to the Medal of Honor) and two Purple Hearts there as a Marine PFC. He lost one finger and two toes to frostbite (as well as being shot) in two weeks of battle in a place where hell froze over in Korea.

If you talk to soldiers who were with the 101st Airborne in the WW II Battle of the Bulge, they will tell you how hard it was to fight in the coldest winter of the 20th Century in Europe (1944). One Army infantry vet told me he slept in a house 9 days from June 6, 1944 to May 5th, 1945 (the rest of the time he said "we lived like animals in the woods in fighting holes, under regular enemy artillery fire and small arms fire, two men to a hole, hugging each other at night for warmth, in - 40 degree weather and snow"). Stephen Ambrose talks about this a lot in his book "Citizen Soldiers," a book about the citizen soldier army that fought in Europe in 1944-45.

So, if they get a little cold, but learn how to fight under those conditions, it will be money in the bank if they ever get thrown into that kind of a situation...they will know how to suck it up in the cold and ruck on.

One of the saddest stories of the Korean war was the story of the US Army 24th Division, led by MG Dean (who became a POW) who faced the first assualt of the Korean war...they were malled by the North Koreans and many soldiers became KIA's/WIA's and POW's because they had led the soft life in a peacetime Army lifestyle in nice warm barracks and were not ready for the rigors and challenges of war conditions in the field. They were caught flat-footed, out of shape, with little ammunition and ran for their lives...that division derisively got known as the "bugout boogie division" in Korea because they always were "bugging out" (abandoning their positions in even light contact) and running away from battles, until they were finally relieved by sturdier soldiers and officers. All of this is documented in a good book out this Christmas in bookstores like Barnes & Noble on the Korean War by David Halberstam.

I wish your DS, and mine, good training that will prepare them to survive and overcome in inclement weather conditions and arduous circumstances. If they learn that now, they have a better chance of coming back to us from inhospitable places they are called to go.

Shop this Christmas for tan winter "underarmor" at the BX uniform shop or in AAFES Catalogs if your DS is going to go to Korea. He will need it. I wish you and your DS a great Christmas together. God Bless. :)

Saltydad

Re: Ft Sill BOLC II

Post by Saltydad » Mon Dec 08, 2008 9:53 pm

:) Not much longer now, Ds stated his canteen was half frozen last week. They are expecting snow while they camp under the stars this week, hope they packed their long johns.
I will be happy to see him for Christmas, wish all the good folks on this site could see your loved ones during the holidays. :cry: I guess I will know next year when he is overseas. boo-hooooooo
GoNolesmom,

Camping under the stars...that is a nice way of putting it. My DS sent a request for under-armor underwear for Christmas after some cold nights in Oklahoma. He has to stay at Ft. Sill for BOLC III this winter and finishes at end of April 09.

MY DS is from Minnesota (where it is + 15 degrees and snowing tonight), but he says it is still cold in OK. Prior to going into the Army this past year he was a Railroad Conductor for three years on Freight Trains running between the Twin Cities and central Iowa for the Union Pacific Railroad. He had to work outside a lot in the Minnesota winters, walking the length of 100 car trains fromthe engine to rear car to set air brakes and often was hanging on boxcars as they shoved cars together to make up trains in a railyard in -20 degree weather. He says you never quite get used to it, but you find ways to tolerate the cold and still work.

As much as it is a pain in the butt to put up with a week of cold weather camping, it is good training for soldiers going to Korea like your DS (or for those going to Afhghanistan). In fighting in Iraq, where it is hot most of the time, we lose sight of many places where it is really cold to fight...Korea and Afghanistan...continuing hot spots in cold places.

I served with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force (3rd FSSG, 3rd MARDIV, and 1st Marine Air Wing) on Okinawa for three years in the mid-80's and we were the ready reaction force to reinforce the US Army 2nd Infanty Division on the DMZ in Korea (along with the 25th ID from Hawaii, Alaska, and Ft. Lewis, WA) if North Korea attacked across the 38th parallel. Twice a year we practiced a fire drill to get to Korea ASAP (each Fall we practiced an exercise called "Bear Hunt" that went from September through December and the other from February-April called "Team Spirit"...where all of III MEF flew or went by ship into Korea prepared to fight North Korea). I had many a cold night in Korea on those operations "camping out with the Marines under the stars" in field conditions. It was good training in fighting in the cold and learning how to live outside and fight in the winter.

The Army and Marine Corps have long memories of the Battle of the Choisen Resevior fought in December 1950 up near the Yalu River next to China, where the 1st Marine Regiment and the 7th Army Regiment fought bloody battles, outnumbered 20 to 1, against the Chinese Army... in weather that reached -50 degrees in blowing snow storms. They called it the "Frozen Choisen." My Marine OCS Platoon Sergent in 1965 fought in that frigid battle in 1950 with the 1st Marines under Col. "Chesty" Puller, USMC, and he won a Navy Cross (like the Distinguished Service Cross in the Army...next in preceedance to the Medal of Honor) and two Purple Hearts there as a Marine PFC. He lost one finger and two toes to frostbite (as well as being shot) in two weeks of battle in a place where hell froze over in Korea.

If you talk to soldiers who were with the 101st Airborne in the WW II Battle of the Bulge, they will tell you how hard it was to fight in the coldest winter of the 20th Century in Europe (1944). One Army infantry vet told me he slept in a house 9 days from June 6, 1944 to May 5th, 1945 (the rest of the time he said "we lived like animals in the woods in fighting holes, under regular enemy artillery fire and small arms fire, two men to a hole, hugging each other at night for warmth, in - 40 degree weather and snow"). Stephen Ambrose talks about this a lot in his book "Citizen Soldiers," a book about the citizen soldier army that fought in Europe in 1944-45.

So, if they get a little cold, but learn how to fight under those conditions, it will be money in the bank if they ever get thrown into that kind of a situation...they will know how to suck it up in the cold and ruck on.

One of the saddest stories of the Korean war was the story of the US Army 24th Division, led by MG Dean (who became a POW) who faced the first assualt of the Korean war...they were malled by the North Koreans and many soldiers became KIA's/WIA's and POW's because they had led the soft life in a peacetime Army lifestyle in nice warm barracks and were not ready for the rigors and challenges of war conditions in the field. They were caught flat-footed, out of shape, with little ammunition and ran for their lives...that division derisively got known as the "bugout boogie division" in Korea because they always were "bugging out" (abandoning their positions in even light contact) and running away from battles, until they were finally relieved by sturdier soldiers and officers. All of this is documented in a good book out this Christmas in bookstores like Barnes & Noble on the Korean War by David Halberstam.

I wish your DS, and mine, good training that will prepare them to survive and overcome in inclement weather conditions and arduous circumstances. If they learn that now, they have a better chance of coming back to us from inhospitable places they are called to go.

Shop this Christmas for tan winter "underarmor" at the BX uniform shop or in AAFES Catalogs if your DS is going to go to Korea. He will need it. I wish you and your DS a great Christmas together. God Bless. :)

Saltydad

Post by linbetts » Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:44 pm

The guys at Ft Benning are out in the field too this week . . Linbetts, do you think those wild bores are still running around the woods in Georgia?
Yeah.....they run when the weather is cool! :twisted:

Post by Jessi » Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:18 pm

The guys at Ft Benning are out in the field too this week . . Linbetts, do you think those wild bores are still running around the woods in Georgia?

Post by Kym » Mon Dec 08, 2008 4:09 pm

Linbetts,

This time they are sleeping under the stars for real...no indoor bunks for the next couple of days. I know my DH isn't too happy about it! After his camelback froze during last Friday's 10 mile ruck march he decided it was too cold :D.

Post by linbetts » Mon Dec 08, 2008 3:51 pm

Last time I heard, camping "under the stars" was actually in a permanent fob....a fairly substantial building, with real mattresses on their cots. Still cold outside, and all of their activities are outdoors, but they will do fine! When my DD was there a couple ofyears ago, the structures has just been completed, and they got to take the plastic wrap off the brand new mattresses.....they were the first class to use them. :) The classes in Jan/Feb, get to do the early morning rucks with icicles hanging from their helmets! 8O I still say it's better than 117 degrees on the firing range in August in full gear!

Ft Sill BOLC II

Post by GoNolesmom » Mon Dec 08, 2008 3:36 pm

:) Not much longer now, Ds stated his canteen was half frozen last week. They are expecting snow while they camp under the stars this week, hope they packed their long johns.
I will be happy to see him for Christmas, wish all the good folks on this site could see your loved ones during the holidays. :cry: I guess I will know next year when he is overseas. boo-hooooooo

Post by Saltydad » Thu Nov 06, 2008 5:10 pm

SaltyDad....nice to see you post from time to time. Love your assessment of the scope of BOLCII training. One of my favorite pictures of my DD from there is of her wielding a sledge hammer that must have weighed at least 30 pounds and trying to knock down a door on a building they were clearing. She only weighed about 115 at the time and stands about 5'4"....not a large woman! She had better luck kicking the doors down!

They will do a drill where they are under attack in an enclosed area....complete with smoke bombs, the sound of artillery and gunfire, people yelling all around.....being caught off guard and completely disoriented. A whole new experience for the non-priors and an example of just how quickly things can get crazy in an ambush.

BOLCII is an opportunity for officers from every commissioning program to come together and train. DD's company even had some nurses training with them. They did everything that all the other soldiers did.....as you said, everyone from all branches has the potential for being exposed to danger of IED's, ambush and more.....there is no safe-haven in the rear. Better to train for all contingencies than to be caught flat-footed, wondering how the 'ell to get out of the situation!

Lawton isn't bad if you like the outdoors. If you are looking for big city activities, you won't find them here.....but it has it's own brand of unique. The post itself is quite pretty in certain areas....much greener than most people would think....maybe not so much now, but still lots of trees. The Old Garrison is very interesting, as is the museum and Cannon Walk. It has a colorful history that goes back to the days of the Cavalry defending the settlers from the Indian attacks, and is the only one of the Indian outposts still in use today as a military garrison. There are two pretty chapels there that have been favorite locations for many a military wedding, complete with the bride and groom being driven away atop a caisson!

I think it's not a bad place to train.....and they have the advantage of some of the best weather right now.....maybe some cool days and a few chilly nights, but no blistering central plains summer heat, and no more GA humidity!

Good luck to all who are there!
Linda,

Always a pleasure to connect with you. You are a fountanhead of knowledge about this Army life that is helpful to all of us. The information on Ft. Sill will come in handy if we get down there and do some sightseeing.

Since my son snowbirded at Ft. Sill since OCS graduation on 9/11/08, he has been used to augment the cadre in field ops in being part of an aggressor force ambushing and probing BOLC II student defensive perimeters in training in the field. He really enjoyed it from that perspective. Now the shoe is on the other foot and he has to be a student on the receiving end of what he was doing to the class before him.

Anyway, thanks for you continued interest in my son and tips on Army life. Wish you the best in the days ahead.

Saltydad

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